The Power of Separate Realities

How often have you given instructions to someone and walked away thinking you had communicated clearly, only to find later that person had heard something completely different? Or you were recommended a movie by a friend who raved about how good it was, only for you to come away thinking that was an 1.5 hours of your life you’ll never get back! Have you ever wondered why that is?

We live in a world of 6.5 billion separate realities. Each individual is born with the gift of thought, the ability to create our own experience through our thinking in the moment, but how that gift presents itself is unique to each individual. We cannot possibly think the same as anyone else. We may see the same thing and have a similar view but the exact way we think about it will be different and therefore our experience of it will also be different.

Seeing that each person has their own unique perspective of the world through the power of Thought, which means they can’t possibly see it as you do, brings a new understanding to how we communicate with others. When two people come into a conversation trying to understand the other person’s point of view — the way they see the situation or challenge — rather than to get their own point of view or agenda across, then the conversation takes on a different direction. Outcomes can be achieved quickly, differences resolved and stronger connections ultimately made.

Once you become aware of this, you’ll notice separate realities playing out everywhere and how it can be the source of a lot of conflict and misunderstandings. In the media, the way stories are reported; in religion, where people think their beliefs are ‘right’; in sports, the violence that can occur at matches between the fans of opposing teams; on social media, the abuse and trolling that comes from someone who has a different opinion; at the office with interdepartmental conflict, travelling to work with road rage incidents; we are faced with separate realities in all situations. It is a result of the imbalanced ego needing to be right at all costs and if our point of view is not seen, then that means the other person is stupid, ignorant or disliked.

Becoming aware of this truth has had a deep impact on me. It has made me more empathic in conversations, changed the way I speak with people and view situations, minimised my ‘offence mechanism’, allowed me to be more open to seeing and doing things differently and altered my perception on how I view the world and everyone in it. I invite you to explore this further and see for yourself the changes it will make for you, your leadership team or organisation.

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